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Reading Information

Welcome to my classroom! This will be a year filled with many new experiences for your child. Each day we will be actively engaged in learning.  We will incorporate our novels in the reading cafe.  Here is a little information regarding the reading cafe.


We have just begun our Daily 5 and CAFÉ adventure! This is the reading and writing program implemented in my classroom.


Daily 5 is the structure we will use to plan our morning. Children will be busy completing meaningful literacy tasks. The choices will be:


  • Read to self
  • Work on writing
  • Word Work
  • Listen to reading
  • Read to Someone

  • Right now, we are focusing on increasing our stamina to work independently during Read to Self. Within the next few months, the other choices will be introduced. While the students are completing their literacy tasks, I will be meeting with small groups and conferencing with individual students.

    Daily 5 is how we schedule our language block. CAFÉ is what we study during this time. CAFÉ is an acronym for the four major components of reading. They are:
  • C for Comprehension
  • A for Accuracy
  • F for Fluency
  • E for Expanding Vocabulary

  • The children will learn reading strategies within each category. These strategies will become tools for the children to use to help themselves become better readers and writers.

    It is going to be exciting to watch your child's reading and writing skills blossom throughout the year.



    TIPS FOR TEACHING KIDS TO ENJOY READING FROM THE WEBSITE PARENTS CHOICE

    Tips for Teaching Kids to Enjoy Reading 
    By Kristi Jemtegaard 

    1. The key to reading is words: hearing them, saying them, seeing them, and connecting them to everyday life. Simply talking—in the grocery store, on the way to school, before bed—guarantees a richer vocabulary for your child. 

    2. Set aside a special time each day to read together. Find a quiet place where you can focus on the book. Pretty soon, your child will make the connection between the pleasure of undivided attention and the pleasure of reading.

    3. Expect disasters. Sometimes reading just isn’t in the cards. Don’t push it. The last thing you want is to turn it into a battle. But be prepared to grab unexpected opportunities. Always have a book with you—in your bag, in the car, at the pool: waiting is a lot easier on everyone if there’s a story to share. 

    4. Read books you like. Your enjoyment will be infectious. 
    Read books your children pick themselves … and praise their choices. 

    5. Stop occasionally to ask your child questions about the pictures or about what they just heard. Try to ask questions that require more than a yes or no answer. “What do you think is going to happen next?” “Who do you like best in this story?” 

    6. Connect stories to things that happen in your daily life. If you just read a story about a dog, point out all the dogs you see and talk about them: How big? What color? Who do you think they belong to? Make up a new story together about the dog … then find someone else to tell it to. 

    7. Stop occasionally and point out an interesting word with your finger. Say it and have your child repeat it. Pre-readers don’t need to learn it … yet … but this reinforces the idea that those funny black lines on the page actually contain the magic of meaning. 

    8. Capitalize on your child’s interests. If he or she likes bugs, find all the bug books you can. Read fiction and fact books. If they ask you a question, go together to a book to look for the answer—even if you know the answer already. 

    9. Watch television together and talk about it. Compare what you see on the tube to real life and to real books. Ask questions. Make connections. Find books about things you’ve seen and read them as a follow-up. 

    10. Visit the library. You don’t have to be rich to have a house full of books. Attend storytimes. Ask the librarian for books suggestions. And check out a book for yourself. You’re the best advertisement for reading there is! 

    About the Author:Kristi Jemtegaard is the Youth Services Supervisor/Children's Specialist for the Arlington Public Library system in Virginia. She also serves as adjunct faculty in the Education Department of the University of Virginia and has taught at Catholic University in Washington D.C. 
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